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Vivas to Those Who Have Failed

Vivas to Those Who Have Failed

by Martin Espada Reviewed by MIKE SONKSEN Martin Espada’s latest book celebrates his recently departed father and forgotten voices. Poet and professor Martin Espada’s latest book, Vivas to Those Who Have Failed, takes its title from a line in a Walt Whitman poem. Published by Norton, the 34 poems in this collection carry on the Whitmanian […]


Popular Art From the Heart of Portugal: Heaven, Hell and Somewhere In Between

Popular Art From the Heart of Portugal: Heaven, Hell and Somewhere In Between

by Anthony Alan Shelton Reviewed by RICHARD SIMAS What a fascinating read and visual feast is anthropologist Anthony Alan Shelton’s Heaven, Hell and Somewhere In Between, an exquisite photo album and collection of essays on Portuguese popular art. The book is a companion piece for the 2015 major exhibition curated by Shelton at the University of […]


The Arab of the Future: A Childhood in the Middle East

The Arab of the Future: A Childhood in the Middle East

by Riad Sattouf Reviewed by Yago Cura I was in the fifth grade when Reagan dispatched a squadron of F-11’s to bomb targets in Libya in retaliation for a bombing at a discotheque in Berlin that had killed several servicemen. That day in 1986, in fifth grade after-school care at Winston Park Elementary School in […]


In Like Company: The Genealogy of an Anthology

In Like Company: The Genealogy of an Anthology

by Jim Heavily In poetry, publishing is a kind of broadcasting. Never heard how to preserve our stack of poems. —Laura Jensen I. Apologia & Proemia My original intent was to write a review of the new anthology, In Like Company: The Salt River Review & Porch Anthology, edited by James Cervantes, but anyone who’s […]


An Interview with Graciela Limón

An Interview with Graciela Limón

Thelma Reyna interviews Mexican-American writer, Graciela Limón.


For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet’s Journey

For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet’s Journey

by Richard Blanco Reviewed by THELMA T. REYNA When Richard Blanco stepped to the podium on January 21, 2013 at the inauguration of President Barack Obama, I rose from my sofa in the living room and stood enthralled as I watched the TV screen. Along with hundreds of thousands of people in the Washington DC […]


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by Justin Petropoulos and Carla Gannis Reviewed by MATTHEW SCHMIDT This is more than a book, more than drawings or renderings. There is so much at work in this project that it could be dissected again immediately after this is written and with a different set of values. <legend>   </legend> is a collaboration between poet […]


Haikus Bilardo

Haikus Bilardo

by FERNANDO FIGUERAS & JOSÉ MARÍA MARCOS reviewed by YAGO S. CURA During the 1986 and 1990 F.I.F.A. World Cups, Carlos Salvador Bilardo was the Icarus millions of Argentines pinned their little pieces of wax to—even as they badmouthed his impetuous squads. Currently, Bilardo is the general manager of Argentina’s National Teams, but he was […]


Odas a Fúbolistas

Odas a Fúbolistas

by YAGO S. CURA & ABEL FOLGAR reviewed DANIEL COUDRIET Illustrated by Chaz Folgar Especially as we prepare for the 2014 World Cup, I couldn’t help but revisit Cura & Folgar’s Odas a Fútbolistas (Hinchas de Poesía, 2010) which brings together two of my favorite things—poetry and football.  As a chapbook project, it seems especially […]


Ascension

Ascension

by LUIVETTE RESTO Reviewed by CHE CHRIST CRUZ Ascension. Upon first impression, the title immediately grabs my interest, to rise up to another level, or to move above and beyond. For me this word carries a deep celestial connotation with it as well, not so much though for the journey of Muhammad rising to paradise […]


Naming Ceremony

Naming Ceremony

by Chip Livingston Reviewed by JIM HEAVILY On Naming & Identity – Part I People if you like to believe it can be made by their names. Call anybody Paul and they get to be a Paul call anybody Alice and they get to be an Alice perhaps yes perhaps no, there is something in […]


From Mr. Bondo’s Unshared Life

From Mr. Bondo’s Unshared Life

by James Cervantes Reviewed by GREG SIMON (curator unknown) In lieu of any direction from our author, he whom we who know him well [or think we do] must have his hands forcibly held over the roaring fires of guilt and consequences in order to come up with pages of prose: we, his faithful or […]


The Unknown University: The Poetry of Roberto Bolaño (Part 2)

The Unknown University: The Poetry of Roberto Bolaño (Part 2)

by Roberto Bolaño Reviewed by JAMES CERVANTES Part 2: More on the perils of translation and When poetry trumps prose Recently, Tim Parks wrote in the New York Review of Books: . . . as the separate stylistic devices disappear in translation, so does the pattern that they combined to sustain; losing the pattern one […]


The Unknown University:
The Poetry of Roberto Bolaño (Part 1)

The Unknown University:The Poetry of Roberto Bolaño (Part 1)

by Roberto Bolaño Reviewed by JAMES CERVANTES Part I: An Introduction via Translation Hector Tobar wrote in the July 12, 2013 issue of the L.A. Times Book Review: “As busy as Roberto Bolaño’s afterlife has been — he’s published 19 books in English since his death in 2003 — his time on Earth was even […]


Pocos Son los Elegidos Perros del Mal

Pocos Son los Elegidos Perros del Mal

by Eusebio Ruvalcaba Reviewed by YAGO S. CURA Ruvalcaba’s Adolescent Hangmen, Namby Pamby Matriciders, & Ingenuous Extortionists Editor’s note: Since no translation of Ruvalcaba’s short story collection exists, the author of the review has translated all titles and dialogue which appear in Ruvalcaba’s short story collection. Eusebio Ruvalcaba is a Guadalajaran writer with a knack […]


The Boy Who Could See Demons

The Boy Who Could See Demons

by Carolyn Jess-Cooke Reviewed by AMY BRADLEY I met Ruen and his friends five years, five months and six days ago. It was the morning that Mum said Dad had gone, and I was at school…. Ruen has explained many things to me about who he is and what he does, but never about why I […]


How Fire Is a Story, Waiting

How Fire Is a Story, Waiting

by Melinda Palacio Reviewed by THELMA REYNA How Fire Is a Story, Waiting Melinda Palacio Tia Chucha Press, 2012 107 pp. $14.95 (paper) Buy it from the press Melinda Palacio’s first full-length volume of poetry charged out of the gate with modest fanfare but with hopes full and robust. Less than a year later, the […]


Gringos at the Gate: A Documentary

Gringos at the Gate: A Documentary

Reviewed by YAGO S. CURA Despite a robust youth soccer apparatus, fútbol in the U.S. has always been relegated to an activity solely conducted by immigrants, derelicts, and contrarians. The U.S. sports pantheon doesn’t have room on the mantle for another sport that’s not basketball, baseball, or football (and sometimes hockey), especially one as flamboyant […]


The Gringo: A Memoir

The Gringo: A Memoir

by J. Grigsby Crawford Reviewed by JIM HEAVILY My daughter, at some point during her undergraduate studies at Guilford, a small liberal arts college located in Greensboro, North Carolina, entertained the idea of joining the Peace Corps, probably as she neared her junior year. I think she even went so far as to send off […]


Leaving Tulsa

Leaving Tulsa

by Jennifer Elise Foerster Reviewed by BOJAN LEWIS Most of the present day canon of Indigenous Literature—true Indigenous Literature and not the midlife crisis musings of a gringo who’s discovered a couple of Indian blood cells beneath a microscope—is filled with the scattered artifacts and disturbed and disinterred remains of our ancestors, the poetics of mapped […]


Empire

Empire

by Xochiquetzal Candelaria Reviewed by JIM CERVANTES Empire Iron and Feathers Thinking to get a grasp of the arc of Candelaria’s Empire, I read the four “Empire” poems that are spread throughout the book’s three sections: “Empire #1: Five and Dime Store, 1949”; “Empire #2: Poet”; Empire #3: Marriage”; and “Empire #4: Mirror.” In “Empire […]


Natural Takeover of Small Things

Natural Takeover of Small Things

by Tim Z. Hernandez Reviewed by YAGO S. CURA Natural Takeover of Poems are tied to the land in instances where the language used in those poems speaks to the land in the people. These poems of place should be issued passports; their words establish an embassy of sorts, in the mind. Darwish’s poems are […]


Errançities

Errançities

by Quincy Troupe Reviewed by BOJAN LEWIS Quincy Troupe’s Arpeggios and Wanderings “Somewhere in Another Preventable Tragedy” Quincy Troupe, now seventy-three, has been writing jazz—and writing about jazz with jazz musicians—through eight poetry collections and two best-selling books about Miles Davis: Miles: The Autobiography (coauthor) and Miles and Me. Troupe is known for dropping free-verse […]


Say Sand

Say Sand

by Daniel Coudriet Reviewed by GRAY KANE An Apocalypse of Self Daniel Coudriet’s poems have appeared in Verse, Denver Quarterly, American Letters & Commentary, Crazyhorse, The Iowa Review, Harvard Review, and Conjunctions, among others. His first book, Say Sand, shakes its readers with sensual, often tactile language that challenges readers’ interpretive abilities. The proem evokes […]